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EnviroESCA Sample holders

Adjust your EnviroESCA to your current experimental needs with our range of sample plates!

EnviroESCA has been designed with the idea in mind that in the future, any kind of sample should be XPS compatible. While samples up to 12 cm in diamater and 4 cm in height can be introduced on the large main plate, some experiments require a more specialized approach. The plate can therefore be outfitted with different specialized sample holders for achieving different temperatures, hold SEM stub type holders, or introduce electrical contacts to the sample.

KEY FEATURES

  • Multiple sample holder options, adjusted to your experimental needs
  • SEM stub compatible High Temperature holder for laser heating up to 800 °C
  • Resistive heating plate for temperatures up to 600 °C
  • Peltier cooled plate for temperatures down to 5 °C
  • Multipin in situ electrical contacts available

MADE FOR THESE METHODS

1

RELATED PRODUCTS

6

APPLICATION NOTES

PUBLICATIONS

  1. (2020) Effects of Background Gas Composition and Pressure on 1,4-Polymyrcene (and Polytetrafluoroethylene) Spectra in near-ambient pressure XPS

    Near-ambient pressure XPS (NAP-XPS) is a less traditional form of XPS that allows samples to be analyzed at relatively high pressures, i.e., at 2500 Pa or greater. With NAP-XPS, XPS can analyze moderately volatile liquids, biological samples, porous materials, and/or polymeric materials that outgas significantly. In this submission we show C 1s, O 1s and survey NAP-XPS spectra from 1,4-polymyrcene. The C 1s and O 1s envelopes are fit with Gaussian-Lorentzian product, asymmetric Lorentzian, and Gaussian-Lorentzian sum functions, respectively. Water vapor and argon are used to control sample charging, and the corresponding signals from the gases are present in the survey spectra. The effect of background gas pressure on photoelectron attenuation is illustrated with a sample of polytetrafluoroethylene.



    Dhananjay I. Patel, Aleksandar Matic, Helmut Schlaad, Stephan Bahr, Paul Dietrich, Michael Meyer, Andreas Thißen, Sven Tougaard, and Matthew R. Linford
    Surface Science Spectra (Vol.27, Issue 1)
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  2. (2020) Polyethylene terephthalate by near-ambient pressure XPS

    Near-ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) is a less traditional form of XPS that allows samples to be analyzed at relatively high pressures, i.e., at greater than 2500 Pa. With NAP-XPS, XPS can probe moderately volatile liquids, biological samples, porous materials, and/or polymeric materials that outgas significantly. In this submission, we show survey, C 1s, and O 1s NAP-XPS spectra of polyethylene terephthalate, a common, widely used thermoplastic. The C 1s envelope was fit with different approaches, i.e., to three, four, and five Gaussian–Lorentzian sum (GLS) functions. Hartree–Fock orbital energy calculations of a model trimer served as a guide to an additional fit of the C 1s envelope. The best fit was obtained by adding an extra component to the four-component fit to compensate for adventitious carbon or additives in the polymer. The O 1s signal was well fit with two GLS peaks with a 1:1 area ratio representing the C—O and C=O moieties in PET.



    Tahereh G. Avval, Grant T. Hodges, Joshua Wheeler, Daniel H. Ess, Stephan Bahr, Paul Dietrich, Michael Meyer, Andreas Thißen, and Matthew R. Linford
    Surface Science Spectra 27, 014006 (2020)
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  3. (2020) Roman coin, by near-ambient pressure XPS

    Near ambient pressure-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) is a less traditional form of XPS that allows samples to be analyzed at relatively high pressures, i.e., at greater than 2500 Pa. With NAP-XPS, XPS can probe moderately volatile liquids, biological samples, porous materials, and/or polymeric materials that outgas significantly. In this submission, we show survey, O 1s/Ag 3p, Ca 3p/Ag 3d, and extended valence band (0–130 eV) NAP-XPS spectra of an ancient Roman coin at three different positions. A small N 1s signal from N2 background gas is also observed. On the obverse side, the coin bears the bust of Licinius I. On the reverse side, it bears the image of Jupiter. The Ag 3d region indicates different amounts of silver at different oxidation states in different positions.



    Tahereh G. Avval, Sean C. Chapman, Jeffrey T. Chapman, Stephan Bahr, Paul Dietrich, Michael Meyer, Andreas Thißen, and Matthew R. Linford
    Surface Science Spectra 27, 014022 (2020)
    Read more
  4. (2020) Role of Water in Phase Transformations and Crystallization of Ferrihydrite and Hematite

    The oxides, hydroxides, and oxo-hydroxides of iron belong to the most abundant materials on earth. They also feature a wide range of practical applications. In many environments, they can undergo facile phase transformations and crystallization processes. Water appears to play a critical role in many of these processes. Despite numerous attempts, the role of water has not been fully revealed yet. We present a new approach to study the influence of water in the crystallization and phase transformations of iron oxides. The approach employs model-type iron oxide films that comprise a defined homogeneous nanostructure. The films are exposed to air containing different amounts of water reaching up to pressures of 10 bar. Ex situ analysis via scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction is combined with operando near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to follow water-induced changes in hematite and ferrihydrite. Water proves to be critical for the nucleation of hematite domains in ferrihydrite, the resulting crystallite orientation, and the underlying crystallization mechanism.



    A. Arinchtein, R. Schmack, K. Kraffert, J. Radnik, P. Dietrich, . Sachse, R. Kraehnert
    ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
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