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OC4

Oscillation controller with digitally integrated PLL

Nanonis OC4
Nanonis OC4 oscillation controller

The oscillation controller (OC4) adds dynamic and multifrequency AFM capabilities to the Nanonis controller. The z-feedback can regulate on any signal coming from the mechanical resonator with any predefined SafeTip™ conditions. Imaging modes include among others: non-contact AFM, intermittent contact mode, phase imaging, multifrequency AFM, dissipation. With an input bandwidth of 5MHz, the OC4 can operate any type of cantilever, tuning fork, needle sensors, etc. and their harmonics. It is also perfect as a digital lock-in and signal analyzer (FFT) up to 5 MHz and can be further extended for Kelvin probe applications or customized in LabVIEW or any programming language with the Nanonis programming interface.

KEY FEATURES

  • Fully digital PLL up to 5MHz: no introduction of noise or drift from analog or mixed signals
  • Digitally integrated into the Nanonis control system, easy access to all internal signals
  • Any signal or combination can be used as z-feedback, user-defined SafeTip™ features
  • 4 independent demodulators for multifrequency operation
  • Advanced filtering: independent lock-in filters with selectable order (1. to 8.) and cut-off frequency (100 mHz to 50 kHz)  for each demodulator
  • Integrated oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer (FFT) with continuous display up to 5MHz
  • Demodulation bandwidth up to 5 kHz
  • Frequency and phase sweep spectrum for maximum amplitude and minimum excitation
  • perfectPLL™: automatic PLL-tuning according to the Q-factor, demodulation bandwidth, and gain
  • TrueDissipation: automatic correction of apparent damping for precise dissipation measurements
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MADE FOR THESE METHODS

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APPLICATION NOTES

Drift-Corrected 3D Dynamic Force Spectroscopy at Room Temperature
Drift-Corrected 3D Dynamic Force Spectroscopy at Room Temperature
The ability to collect 3D dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) data opens the door to valuable and more complete information of the interaction forces at the atomic scale. True site-specific atomic scale interaction forces and potential energies were accessible before mainly at low temperatures due to the absence of instrumentation-induced artifacts.
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Controlling QPlus small Amplitudes with Nanonis Setup
Controlling QPlus small Amplitudes with Nanonis Setup
A growing number of users are opting for a modified setup of their STM combining a standard instrument with a QPlus Sensor to do non-contact AFM. QPlus sensors can be easily integrated with the existing STM head since they are based on oscillations of quartz tuning forks. The detection of such oscillations is done electrically and no additional laser system is required. When combined with low temperature this technique leads to a large spectrum of applications.
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Non-Contact Atomic Resolution in Liquid Using Nanonis OC4
Non-Contact Atomic Resolution in Liquid Using Nanonis OC4
AFM imaging in liquid is often challenging due to poor quality factor of the cantilever and high environmental noise. With these challenges in mind, we constructed a beam-deflection AFM designed for imaging in various environments [1, 2]. Since we wanted to operate our AFM in frequency modulation mode, we combined the Nanonis OC4 (used as a PLL) together with the Asylum MFP3D controller and were able to obtain true atomic-resolution in liquid (right image).
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Automated Switching Between Non-Contact and Contact Modes of AFM
Automated Switching Between Non-Contact and Contact Modes of AFM
The study of plasticity by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a fascinating experiment, as it is possible to observe the nucleation of single dislocations directly in the indentation force curve and image the resulting deformed surface structure with high resolution.
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OC4-Station and VEECO EnviroScope - Advanced Vacuum Measurements
OC4-Station and VEECO EnviroScope - Advanced Vacuum Measurements
Veeco EnviroScope combines a hermetically sealed sample chamber with scanning microscopy. Due to the relative high Q factor of the cantilevers in vacuum this instrument can be operated with an external PLL for advanced combined measurements, i.e. nc-AFM, MFM, EFM…
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Single Pass Kelvin Probe Measurement Technique in Air with Dual-OC4
Single Pass Kelvin Probe Measurement Technique in Air with Dual-OC4
The Kelvin probe technique is increasingly gaining importance in AFM measurements since it gives access not only to the topography but also to chemical information of the tip and sample. It is an extremely sensitive analytical method to detect changes in contact potential difference between different materials or chemical elements on the surface.
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Compensating for CPD in NC-AFM: AM-KPFM in UHV using Dual-OC4
Compensating for CPD in NC-AFM: AM-KPFM in UHV using Dual-OC4
Single pass Kelvin probe imaging (KPFM) gives information on the electronic structure of materials by measuring contact potential difference (CPD) while simultaneously acquiring topography. Under vacuum condition the Q factor is higher than in air, leading to higher resolution for both Kelvin and topography images.
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Modulation of Contact Resonances: Use of PLL in Contact Mode AFM
Modulation of Contact Resonances: Use of PLL in Contact Mode AFM
Friction force microscopy (FFM) is a useful technique capable of characterizing material mechanical properties, such as elastic module, adhesion, and friction down to atomic scale. When combining static lateral force measurements with dynamic measurements of contact resonance frequencies the sensitivity is improved, i.e. subsurface defects are easier to detect than in conventional quasi static FFM.
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Improved Atomic Scale Contrast via Bimodal DFM: Dual OC4
Improved Atomic Scale Contrast via Bimodal DFM: Dual OC4
Frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is an efficient and already widely spread technique to obtain atomically resolved images of insulating or metallic surfaces. Typically, FM-AFM is based on scanning a sharp tip of a macroscopic cantilever over the surface, where the tip-surface distance is usually controlled by the frequency shit (f1) of the first normal resonant mode (f1) of the cantilever. The atomic-scale contrast arises from short range forces; e.g. covalent or ionic bonds, thus the detection sensitivity of the FM-AFMcan be improved by using small tip oscillation amplitudes comparable to the decay length of the short-range forces, ~ 0.1 nm. A lot of efforts are put in this direction in the FM-AFMfield, mainly based on the excitation of a tuning fork sensor or higher flexural modes of cantilevers characterized by largerstiffness.
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Automated Amplitude Calibration in non-contract AFM Mode
Automated Amplitude Calibration in non-contract AFM Mode
Calibration procedures are always very important for correct quantitative measurements in SPM. In the absence of an interferometer, acquiring an accurate calibration using nc-AFM is complicated. The routine also has to be repeated multiple times for an accurate determination of the amplitude calibration factor which requires a non-negligible amount of time.
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Femtogram Resolution for In-Situ Monitoring of FIB and E-Beam Induced Milling
Femtogram Resolution for In-Situ Monitoring of FIB and E-Beam Induced Milling
The optimization of focused ion and electron beam induced processes for the reliable fabrication of micro- and nanodevices has been of increasing importance. For this a further understanding of the basic physics underlying the process is necessary. In-situ process monitoring is an efficient way to move forward in this field.
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Needle Sensor Operation in non-contact AFM Mode
Needle Sensor Operation in non-contact AFM Mode
Needle sensors are becoming increasingly popular to measure the tunneling current while not depending on the current for the distance feedback. A resonance frequency of 1 MHz insures a fast response of the sensor while interacting with the surface, but it requires a highly accurate Phase Locked Loop (PLL) to perform non-contact AFM measurements, especially with low frequency shift set points.
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Atom Manipulation with Nanonis SPM Controller
Atom Manipulation with Nanonis SPM Controller
Atom manipulation often attracts the interest of researchers, not only for observing artificial patterns on the surface, but also since it allows preparing ideal “samples” on surfaces, designed for a specific measurement. At the same time, however, it often requires a complete custom made scanning probe controller. Although the first systematic atom manipulation was demonstrated in 1990s, it is still challenging for mostresearchers. This application notes shows how the fully-digital Nanonis SPM controller with its LabVIEW Programming Interface can significantly reduce the technical challenges and simplify the manipulation process.
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Single-Scan Kelvin Probe Technique in Air with Dual Oscillation Controller
Single-Scan Kelvin Probe Technique in Air with Dual Oscillation Controller
In atomic force microscopy electrostatic forces are usually not discriminated against van-der-Waals forces. Attractive electrostatic forces cause the distance controller to retract the tip from the surface, resulting in erroneous height information in the topography image. Together with Nanonis we developed a novel solution to this longstanding problem.
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Integrating External Equipment - User Chanenels in the Nanonis SPM controller
Integrating External Equipment - User Chanenels in the Nanonis SPM controller
We use the Nanonis SPM Control System and Oscillation Controller to operate our tuning fork-based JEOL microscope. The z-feedback runs on the frequency shift of the tuning fork. To make local capacitance measurements we attached a separately contacted metal tip to one prong of the tuning fork. In our effort to map local charge defects in Hf-based high-k gate films we had to integrate the signals from two ex-ternal lock-in detectors with the data acquisition of the control system.
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Optimizing PLL Feedback Parameters: Nanonis perfectPLL
Optimizing PLL Feedback Parameters: Nanonis perfectPLL
Setting up a phase-locked loop (PLL) for use in non-contact applications is difficult. Four free feedback parameters for amplitude and phase control and two additional free parameters for the z-feedback leave a lot of room for incorrect settings and unwanted tip-crashes. Therefore we wanted to find a simple and reliable way to set up our PLL.
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SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
On-the-Fly Switching Between STM and AFM - Topography Feedback
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SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
Atomic resolution NC-AFM imaging with subangstrom oscillation amplitudes at room temperature
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SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
Acquisition of atomic site specific force spectroscopy and two-dimensional force maps F(x,z) on KBr(001) and Au(111) at room temperature
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SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
Atomic resolution NC-AFM on KBr(001)
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SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
Atomic Resolution NC-AFM on Si(111)-(7x7)
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SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
SPM 150 Aarhus with KolibriSensor
Atomic resolution NC-AFM imaging on Au(111) at room temperature
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